Three Tips for Parents Raising the Next Generation of Case Makers

139If you’re a Christian Case Maker (a Christian interested in making the case for what you believe) and you’re also a parent, you’re probably interested in raising your son or daughter to become a Case Maker as well. I have four kids of my own, so I definitely understand this desire. I want my kids to have the tools and truths they’ll need to be good Christian ambassadors. I want them to understand their worldview and defend it against competing ideas. Parents often contact me to ask what they can do to raise up a generation of competent Christian Case Makers. Here are three quick tips to get you started:

Don’t Defer – Be a Good Case Maker
It’s often said that some things are caught rather than taught, and that’s also true when it comes to transferring a worldview to the next generation. Our kids are watching us and copying our Christian example. That truth often scares me, but it’s the reality of our situation. What kind of Jesus follower are you in front of your kids? Are you someone who openly discusses your worldview around the dinner table? Have you provided your kids with examples of winsome Christian case making as you engage people with other beliefs? Do your kids know they can come to you for answers when they encounter objections related to their faith? Are you prepared to answer their concerns or questions? As parents, we can’t defer this responsibility; we can’t offer our kids a book or a video when they’ve come to us for an answer. We need to be good Christian Case Makers and the first line of defense for our kids.

Don’t Delay – Pick a Good Youth Group
OK, I’m going to say something controversial here: Whatever church you may be in right now, if it’s not a place that helps you equip your kids to make the case for what they believe, find a new church. I know how that probably sounds, but all of us pick a church for one reason or another. Sometimes we make this decision based on the teaching of a pastor or the style of worship. If you’ve got kids, I think it’s fair (at least for a season) to pick a church on the basis of its ability to train your kids. It’s quite likely a church that’s great in one area, may not be great in another. That means you’re probably going to have to sacrifice something for yourself in order to get something important for your kids. It’s worth it. Take the time to find the youth ministry doing the best job in this area and join them in this important mission.

Don’t Deny – Provide a Good Opportunity
You and I both know, however, that many youth groups are more concerned about eating pizza and playing games than they are about developing Case Makers. That’s just the sad reality we live in. As parents, we’re going to need to do something to pick up the slack. I began by volunteering in a youth ministry class; many of my friends began as small group leaders. Whatever it takes, be patient and begin to humbly offer your services until you’ve earned the right to help shape the ministry. In addition to this, consider the value of additional outside training like the Summit Worldview Academy. Yes, I know it’s more expensive than the average summer camp, but that’s because it’s not the average summer camp. I’m probably just like you; I’m living on one income as a detective (I’m a volunteer at Stand to Reason) and I have four kids (two still in high school). I’m often financially strapped. But I’ll do what it takes to get my kids the training they need, even if I can only do it once. I’m on the lookout for good opportunities to supplement what I’ve already taught my kids.

9780781414579_HIIf you’re a parent, you already know how quickly time flies. I can’t believe I have adult children, and I fret about whether I’ve done a good job equipping them over the years. That’s why Susie and I decided to write Cold-Case Christianity for Kids. Our experience as parents, youth leaders and pastors taught us that young people begin to question their faith in junior high. We wanted to provide a resource that would answer critical questions kids might have before they even begin to ask them. We wrote the book for two groups: (1) Parents who can read the material together with their kids, even as their young Christians work through the Cold-Case Christianity for Kids online Academy, and (2) Leaders (like pastors and teachers) who can use the book (along with the free associated teaching resources) to train up larger groups of kids in a classroom or ministry setting. In fact, we have a special offer for educators and ministry leaders to help them teach the case for Jesus. If there’s one thing we’ve learned, it’s the need to be intentional. We need to model a rational Christian life for our kids, put them in a church setting that can help them grow and provide them with intentional opportunities to learn.

J. Warner Wallace is a Cold-Case Detective, a Christian Case Maker, and the author of Cold-Case Christianity, Cold-Case Christianity for Kids, and God’s Crime Scene.

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