Quick Shot: “Moral truths are a matter of personal opinion”

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Our “Quick Shot” series offers brief answers to common objections to the Christian worldview. Each response is limited to one paragraph. These responses are designed to (1) answer the objection as concisely as possible, (2) challenge the objector to think more deeply about his or her claim, and (3) facilitate a “gospel” conversation. In this article, we’re offering “Quick Shot” responses to the objection, Quick Shot: “You don’t need God to know what is morally true. Moral truths are simply a matter of personal opinion.”

Response #1:
“You’re making a claim about moral truth. Is your claim simply a matter of personal opinion? If so, why should I agree with you? Why should I agree with anyone who holds a view different than my own? If moral truths are simply personal opinions, all moral views are equally justified and valid, even if someone believes it’s ok to harm people with whom he or she disagrees. Can you see why this approach to moral truth is dangerous?”

If moral truths are simply personal opinions, all moral views are equally justified and valid, even if someone believes it’s ok to harm people with whom he or she disagrees. Click To Tweet

OR

Response #2:
“Your view is known as ‘moral subjectivism.’ If individuals (subjects) are the source of all moral truth, why shouldn’t each of us simply pursue our own self-interests? If moral truth is rooted in the beliefs and opinions of subjects, why should anyone care about anyone other than himself, his family, or his community? What would make that view wrong if all moral truths simply come from individuals to begin with? How could you tell someone who holds a selfish view that he or she is wrong?”

If moral truth is rooted in the beliefs and opinions of subjects, why should anyone care about anyone other than himself, his family, or his community? Click To Tweet

OR

Response #3:
“This view about the source of moral truth elevates the role of personal feelings. Are you sure that’s a good idea? Lots of people hold moral beliefs based on feelings and emotions rather than careful reasoning. Do we really want to embrace emotional reactions with the same authority we accept reasoned responses? Should both be considered equally valid? Feelings may follow from moral realities, but we must be careful not to allow feelings to dictate moral realities. Can you see the danger in grounding moral truth in personal opinions?”

Feelings may follow from moral realities, but we must be careful not to allow feelings to dictate moral realities. Click To Tweet

Our “Quick Shot” series was written specifically for the Cold-Case Christianity App (you can download it on Apple and Android platforms – be sure to register once you download the App). When confronted with an objection in casual conversation, App users can quickly find an answer without having to scroll beyond the first screen in the category. Use the App “Quick Shots” along with the “Rapid Responses” and Case Making “Cheat Sheets” to become a better Christian Case Maker.

For more information about the scientific and philosophical evidence pointing to a Divine Creator, please read God’s Crime Scene: A Cold-Case Detective Examines the Evidence for a Divinely Created Universe. This book employs a simple crime scene strategy to investigate eight pieces of evidence in the universe to determine the most reasonable explanation. The book is accompanied by an eight-session God’s Crime Scene DVD Set(and Participant’s Guide) to help individuals or small groups examine the evidence and make the case.

J. Warner Wallace is a Dateline featured Cold-Case Detective, Senior Fellow at the Colson Center for Christian Worldview, Adj. Professor of Christian Apologetics at Talbot School of Theology, Biola University, author of Cold-Case ChristianityGod’s Crime Scene, and Forensic Faith, and creator of the Case Makers Academy for kids.

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