Quick Shot: “There are no objective truths”

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Our “Quick Shot” series offers brief answers to common objections to the Christian worldview. Each response is limited to one paragraph. These responses are designed to (1) answer the objection as concisely as possible, (2) challenge the objector to think more deeply about his or her claim, and (3) facilitate a “gospel” conversation. In this article, we’re offering “Quick Shot” responses to the objection, “There are no objective truths.”

Response #1:
“Are you sure? Is that statement objectively true? If there are no objective truths, then the statement, ‘There are no objective truths,’ can’t be objectively true. Do you see the problem? As it turns out, all of us accept some objective truth claims, just as you do when you claim, ‘There is no objective truth.’ The only thing left, then, is to decide which claims are objectively true and which are simply a matter of personal opinion. Have you ever considered the claims Christians make about God? Do you think these kinds of claims are objective or subjective?”

If there are no objective truths, then the statement, ‘There are no objective truths,’ can’t be objectively true. Do you see the problem? Click To Tweet

OR

Response #2:
“There are two kinds of truth claims: objective and subjective. Objective claims are grounded in objects, subjective claims are grounded in subjects (individuals). When I say chocolate chip cookies are the best cookies, that’s simply my personal, subjective opinion. But when I say Isoniazid is the cure for Tuberculosis (TB), that truth is more than simply my opinion. It is grounded in the object known as Isoniazid. That drug either cures TB or it doesn’t, and my opinion doesn’t make it true or false. To say that ‘there are no objective truth claims,’ is to deny this claim about Isoniazid. Have you considered how dangerous that approach would be?”

There are two kinds of truth claims: objective and subjective. Objective claims are grounded in objects, subjective claims are grounded in subjects (individuals). Click To Tweet

Our “Quick Shot” series was written specifically for the Cold-Case Christianity App (you can download it on Apple and Android platforms – be sure to register once you download the App). When confronted with an objection in casual conversation, App users can quickly find an answer without having to scroll beyond the first screen in the category. Use the App “Quick Shots” along with the “Rapid Responses” and Case Making “Cheat Sheets” to become a better Christian Case Maker.

For more information about strategies to help you teach Christian worldview to the next generation, please read So the Next Generation Will Know: Training Young Christians in a Challenging World. This book teaches parents, youth pastors and Christian educators practical, accessible strategies and principles they can employ to teach the youngest Christians the truth of Christianity. The book is accompanied by an eight-session So the Next Generation Will Know DVD Set (and Participant’s Guide) to help individuals or small groups examine the evidence and make the case.

J. Warner Wallace is a Dateline featured Cold-Case Detective, Senior Fellow at the Colson Center for Christian Worldview, Adj. Professor of Christian Apologetics at Talbot School of Theology, Biola University, author of Cold-Case ChristianityGod’s Crime Scene, and Forensic Faith, and creator of the Case Makers Academy for kids.

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