Writings

Confusing Moral Utility With Moral Creation

Are moral laws simply a product of cultural utility and sociocultural evolution? As a skeptic, I used to think so. I believed moral laws evolved along with the species. Humans who accepted certain moral behaviors and principles were far more likely to survive, and that’s exactly what happened; those who …

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The Self-Evident Nature of Objective Moral Truths

I occasionally encounter someone who rejects the existence of objective, transcendent moral truths. For many people, all moral truth is merely perspectival; a matter of flexible, cultural convention. Yet there appear to be a number of moral absolutes that transcend culture and history. These objective truths beckon us to seek …

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Three Things First Responders Can Teach Christians About Engaging Culture

Throughout Christian history, followers of Jesus have debated about how we ought to engage an unbelieving culture. Last month, Rod Dreher, the senior editor at The American Conservative, released The Benedict Option, with the subtitle, “A Strategy for Christians in a Post-Christian Nation.” Dreher’s book seems to have struck a …

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Are Moral Truths Encoded in Our DNA?

How do we arrive at transcendent, objective moral truths like, “It’s never OK to torture babies for fun” or (my new favorite from a blog reader) “It’s never OK to torture non-believers just because you don’t like them?” From where do such commonly held moral notions come? Some people argue …

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